HEAVEN, HELL AND HOBOKEN

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First Detective Series by Poe

Hoboken is known for many things and there are approximately 100 firsts that can be credited to Hoboken.  Some are engineering feats, others are sports feats.  First baseball game was played Hoboken.  However did you know that in the literary world, the first Dectective Series in the US came out of Hoboken and was written by Edgar Allen Poe?

It seems that in the 8140s Poe wrote 3 murder and mayhew short stories using the dectective C August Dupin.  One story, the Mystery of Marie Roget was actually a murder that took place in Hoboken.

Working in John Anderson’s Tabacco Shop  the beautiful victim, a 21 year-old cigar girl, was known for her beauty.  She went missing on July 25th 1841.  Her dead body was found a few days later.

Poe was so intrigued by the news account he wrote the Mystery of Marie Roget.  He changed the setting to Paris, changed the victim’s name, had her body found in the Seine and used the detective Dupin to solve the mystery.  Who would have thunk it?

Hoboken – it’s more than the gentrified town across the Hudson from Manhattan

HEAVEN, HELL AND HOBOKEN, – through Amazon, B&N and Idea Press.

HEAVEN, HELL AND HOBOKEN

Heaven, Hell and Hoboken  is a story filled with intrigue, ethnic tensions, espionage, romance and war.

Set in 1916 Hoboken, New Jersey, a city known before World War I as ‘Little Bremen,’   Martin Taupmann and Kurt Schneider epitomize all that is good about its residents:  honesty, integrity, intelligence, courage.  Yet with the onset of the war, they make choices that irrevocably change their lives forever.  At the same time the demographics and power structure of Hoboken is transformed.   The Germans of Hoboken are the most severely impacted and lose their dominance in education, business and employment.

Available through Amazon, B&N and Idea Press.

Don’t miss this great summer read based on the rarely acknowledged history of the Germans living in New York Harbor towns during WWI.

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Listen to Leo

“The two most powerful warriors are patience and time” – Leo Tolstoy

I was so challenged by my new manuscript.  To wrangle with three storylines in the hope of weaving them all together into a climax and then an ending was arduous.  I had to take a break from it and somehow God, the Universe, sent me the  messenger I needed to move forward.

In August Rosemarie Ruppino, a friend and phenomenal editor, was able to articulate the problem.  Once I had this information, I knew I could negotiate the maze of issues that needed resolution.  A word here, a sentence there and reworking paragraphs  throughout the entire book was all it took.  It became a question of patience and time and belief in myself.  This is no small task.  Creative people are often plagued with doubt.

“Is it working? Does the reader understand? Are the motivations clear?  Are the movements logical?  Should this paragraph go here or there?

January 2014 was a very snowy month.  I was homebound and it provided with the time to develop the climax and end my story.   Don’t know why the fog that had enveloped me for so long.  I finished my new book, Heaven, Hell and Hoboken. 

I’ve had a few readers review it and their opinions were superlative.  I felt this work was my best and their reviews confirmed what I had been hoping.   Below is a bried summary (which I’ll probably redo 20 times.)


Heaven, Hell and Hoboken
 World War I Hoboken is a time of great upheaval.  The Germans of Hoboken are losing their business, being evicting from their homes; others are rounded up as spies.  At the same time, Italian and Irish immigrants are vying for employment vacancies on the docks, storefronts, businss created by the anti-German sentiment running rampant.  Concurrently, the ILA is trying to gain a stronghold on the Hoboken docks.  Heaven, Hell and Hoboken tells a personal story of a family whose every member is touched by the many changes occuring with the onset of WWI.

Now I face a new battle, the  process of seeking representation.  I guess I need to follow Tolstoy’s advice again.  Patience and time.